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Mars Orbiter Resumes Science Operations

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by Staff Writers
Pasadena CA (SPX) Jun 11, 2009
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is examining Mars again with its scientific instruments after successfully transitioning out of a precautionary standby mode triggered by an unexpected June 3 rebooting of its computer. Engineers brought the spacecraft out of the standby mode on June 6. Cameras and other scientific instruments resumed operation June 9. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reached Mars in 2006 and has returned more data about the planet than all other Mars missions combined. The June 3 rebooting resembled a Feb. 23 event on the spacecraft. Engineers are re-investigating possible root causes for both events. The new investigation includes reconsidering the likelihood of erroneous voltage readings resulting from cosmic rays or solar particles hitting an electronic component. Share This Article With Planet Earth
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Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter In Safe Mode After Reboot
Pasadena CA (SPX) Jun 08, 2009
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is in safe mode and in communications with Earth after an unexpected rebooting of its computer Wednesday evening, June 3. The spontaneous reboot resembles a Feb. 23 event on the spacecraft. Engineers concluded the most likely cause for that event was a cosmic ray or solar particle hitting electronics and causing an erroneous voltage reading. ... read more









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