Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy
. Mars Exploration News .

Mars One announces requirements for Red Planet colonists
by Alexandra Kurapova
Moscow (Voice of Russia) Jan 14, 2013

Mars One estimates that it will cost about $6 billion to put the first four astronauts on Mars. While this may seem like a daunting sum for a non-governmental entity, the company is confident it can raise the needed funds by selling corporate sponsorships.

Mars One, a Netherlands-based non-profit company that hopes to deliver the first humans to the Red Planet by 2023, has issued a list of basic requirements for those willing to become Mars colony pioneers.

The most important criteria are to be at least 18 years old, to be intelligent, in good mental and physical health and to be dedicated to the project. Candidates will be subject to a prolonged televised selection process that will begin later this year.

"Gone are the days when bravery and the number of hours flying a supersonic jet were the top criteria," Norbert Kraft, Mars One's chief medical director and a former NASA researcher, said in a statement. "Now, we are more concerned with how well each astronaut works and lives with the others, in the long journey from Earth to Mars and for a lifetime of challenges ahead."

The first colonists will land on the Red Planed in April 2023. New members will arrive every two years after that. None of the Red planet pioneers, the company notes, will ever return to the Earth.

To cover the mission costs, about $6 billion, Mars One says it will launch a reality show, a sort of interplanetary reality show a la "Big Brother", and raise the needed funds by selling corporate sponsorships.

Mars One estimates that it will cost about $6 billion to put the first four astronauts on Mars. While this may seem like a daunting sum for a non-governmental entity, the company is confident it can raise the needed funds by selling corporate sponsorships.

While candidates for the Mars mission will be undergoing the selection process and the whole planet will be observing it on their TVs, Mars One will launch a communications satellite and a supply mission to Mars in 2016, then send a large rover to the Red Planet in 2018, according to the video.

The rover will find the most suitable site for the new Mars colony. After that in 2020 the company will send all necessary settlement components - habitat units, life-support equipment and another rover.

Mars One officials admit they have already approached a number of private spaceflight companies and secured one potential supplier for each colony component. SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket which is still under development but expected to perform its first flight next year, is expected to deliver many components of the first colony to the Red Planet.

Source: Voice of Russia


Related Links
Mars News and Information at
Lunar Dreams and more

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Mars500 project - salt balance of the Mars 'astronauts'
Nuremberg, Germany (SPX) Jan 11, 2013
For 205 days in 2011, Jens Titze, Professor of Electrolyte and Circulatory Research at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, and his team strictly controlled the diet for the Mars500 test subjects during their virtual flight to Mars. Sometimes the selected food contained a lot of salt, sometimes very little. The unexpected result of the longest sodium metabolism study to date was that the assump ... read more

Mission would drag asteroid to the moon

Russia designs manned lunar spacecraft

GRAIL Lunar Impact Site Named for Astronaut Sally Ride

NASA probes crash into the moon

Mr Xi in Space

China plans manned space launch in 2013: state media

China to launch manned spacecraft

Tiangong 1 Parked And Waiting As Shenzhou 10 Mission Prep Continues

Crew Wraps Up Robonaut Testing

Station Crew Ringing in New Year

Expedition 34 Ready to Ring in New Year

New ISS crew docked at Space Station

Halfway Between Uranus and Neptune, New Horizons Cruises On

Dwarf planet Makemake lacks atmosphere

Keck Observations Bring Weather Of Uranus Into Sharp Focus

At Pluto, Moons and Debris May Be Hazardous to New Horizons Spacecraft During Flyby

Cassini Suggests Icing On A Lake

Frozen hydrocarbon ice on Titan's oceans?

Cassini Instrument Learns New Tricks

From Cassini for the Holidays: A Splendor Seldom Seen

Canada Launches Final Stage of RADARSAT Project

China no longer reliant on satellite image imports

TerraSAR-X image of the month - the coastal cliffs of Christmas Island

Joint Polar Satellite System Common Ground System now serving newest mission

AXE to Send 22 Guys to Space with New Apollo Campaign

IBM tops as tech titans scramble for US patents

Chinese tech firms pump up volume at CES

High fashion, high tech intersect at CES confab

Earth-size planets common in galaxy

NASA's Hubble Reveals Rogue Planetary Orbit For Fomalhaut B

NASA, ESA Telescopes Find Evidence for Asteroid Belt Around Vega

Kepler Gets a Little Help From Its Friends

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement