Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Mars Exploration News  




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















MARSDAILY
Hues in a Crater Slope
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Jan 05, 2017


This image was acquired by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on Feb. 28, 2011 at 15:24 local Mars time. It is a stereo pair with image ESP_021454_1550.

Impact craters expose the subsurface materials on the steep slopes of Mars. However, these slopes often experience rockfalls and debris avalanches that keep the surface clean of dust, revealing a variety of hues, like in this enhanced-color image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, representing different rock types.

The bright reddish material at the top of the crater rim is from a coating of the Martian dust.

The long streamers of material are from downslope movements. Also revealed in this slope are a variety of bedrock textures, with a mix of layered and jumbled deposits.

This sample is typical of the Martian highlands, with lava flows and water-lain materials depositing layers, then broken up and jumbled by many impact events.

This image was acquired by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on Feb. 28, 2011 at 15:24 local Mars time. It is a stereo pair with image ESP_021454_1550.

The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.








Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

.


Related Links
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter
Mars News and Information at MarsDaily.com
Lunar Dreams and more






Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
MARSDAILY
Small Troughs Growing on Mars May Become 'Spiders'
Pasadena CA (JPL) Dec 22, 2016
Erosion-carved troughs that grow and branch during multiple Martian years may be infant versions of larger features known as Martian "spiders," which are radially patterned channels found only in the south polar region of Mars. Researchers using NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) report the first detection of cumulative growth, from one Martian spring to another, of channels resultin ... read more


MARSDAILY
China plans probes to far side, poles of Moon

Lunar sonic booms

India Inc joins hands to bid for moon mission

TeamIndus signs contract with ISRO for lunar mission

MARSDAILY
China Plans to Launch 1st Mars Probe by 2020 - State Council Information Office

China to expand int'l cooperation on space sciences

China sees rapid development of space science and technology

China Space Plan to Develop "Strength and Size"

MARSDAILY
Station crew get special delivery from Virginia

Orbital cargo ship arrives at space station

New Instrument on ISS to Study Ultra-Cold Quantum Gases

Two Russians, one American blast off to ISS

MARSDAILY
Exploring Pluto and the Wild Back Yonder

Juno Captures Jupiter 'Pearl'

Juno Mission Prepares for December 11 Jupiter Flyby

Research Offers Clues About the Timing of Jupiter's Formation

MARSDAILY
NASA image showcases Saturn's sun-soaked north pole

Cassini offers a crash course in ring world orbital mechanics

Saturn's bulging core implies moons younger than thought

Cassini Makes First Ring-Grazing Plunge

MARSDAILY
China launches TanSat to study atmospheric carbon dioxide processes

There's a jet stream in our core

Switzerland sees driest December in 150 years

Lockheed Martin Completes Assembly of NOAA's GOES-S Weather Satellite

MARSDAILY
Space station battery replacements to begin New Year's Eve

Launch of Russia's new progress spacecraft set for February 2

Tech show looks beyond 'smart,' to new 'realities'

'Passengers' and the real-life science of deep space travel

MARSDAILY
The blob can learn and teach

Searching a sea of 'noise' to find exoplanets - using only data as a guide

Microlensing Study Suggests Most Common Outer Planets Likely Neptune-mass

Exciting new creatures discovered on ocean floor




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement